Anti-trafficking leadership

Anti-trafficking leadership

Anti-trafficking leadership

Introduction

Many anti-trafficking organisations and charities from minoritised racial groups are poorly resourced and unable to make meaningful impact due to their small size, limited access to networks, reduced financial resources and skills gaps, despite their hard work and passion. This lack of capacity limits their ability to address human trafficking and modern slavery within their communities or provide the protection and support that victims need.

2022 Award

Debbie Ariyo (CF 2019) is the CEO of AFRUCA, a UK anti-trafficking charity which she founded in 2001. Whilst it has achieved some great successes, Debbie has found herself facing many barriers and obstacles in her work as an anti-trafficking innovator caused by her race and by a lack of diversity in the sector. As a result of her Fellowship, Debbie founded the UK BME Anti-Slavery Network (BASNET) to support similar charities in the anti-trafficking space.

Debbie has been awarded one of our Activate grants to build on this work and pilot a three-day residential capacity-building programme in Manchester for 15 anti-trafficking innovators from minoritised racial groups across the UK, focused on how they can achieve change in their communities. The grant will enable her to plan and design the programme; recruit experts to deliver training and skills-building workshops, including on how to apply for funding; produce resource packs; and hire a venue and accommodation for the three-day residential course. Afterwards she will evaluate the programme.

Debbie hopes that by running this programme, 15 innovators will be better equipped to tackle trafficking and modern slavery in their communities and will take the learning back to their organisations to pass onto others. As such, the representation and influence of organisations from minoritised racial groups in this sector should increase.

Debbie’s Fellowship explored community safety nets for victims of human trafficking and forced migration and was supported by the Linbury Trust.

2022 Award

Debbie Ariyo (CF 2019) is the CEO of AFRUCA, a UK anti-trafficking charity which she founded in 2001. Whilst it has achieved some great successes, Debbie has found herself facing many barriers and obstacles in her work as an anti-trafficking innovator caused by her race and by a lack of diversity in the sector. As a result of her Fellowship, Debbie founded the UK BME Anti-Slavery Network (BASNET) to support similar charities in the anti-trafficking space.

Debbie has been awarded one of our Activate grants to build on this work and pilot a three-day residential capacity-building programme in Manchester for 15 anti-trafficking innovators from minoritised racial groups across the UK, focused on how they can achieve change in their communities. The grant will enable her to plan and design the programme; recruit experts to deliver training and skills-building workshops, including on how to apply for funding; produce resource packs; and hire a venue and accommodation for the three-day residential course. Afterwards she will evaluate the programme.

Debbie hopes that by running this programme, 15 innovators will be better equipped to tackle trafficking and modern slavery in their communities and will take the learning back to their organisations to pass onto others. As such, the representation and influence of organisations from minoritised racial groups in this sector should increase.

Debbie’s Fellowship explored community safety nets for victims of human trafficking and forced migration and was supported by the Linbury Trust.